Tag Archives: creativity

Week 7 – these boots were made for… decorating!

20130225-170015.jpg This year I received something absolutely fantastic in the post on Valentine’s Day – a brand spanking new pair of Doc Martens boots (model 1460 smooth milled black, for the attentive to detail). It must be almost fifteen years since I bought my last pair, and those served me well and longer than any pair I’d had previously, so much so that I felt almost like a fly-by-night ingrate for even thinking of replacing them. The process was further complicated by the fact that the exact model that had been so reliable was no longer produced, and I was reluctant to go for something that might be second best.

Ultimately the frustration of not having a wearable pair of Docs won out, and I set to work to find a pair that were most similar to what I’d had. And voila! I love the round toe, the slightly sleeker silhouette and the absence of such bright yellow stitching on these, compared to the absolutely classic model, and I really do think that the milled leather was the secret to the long life of my previous pair – the uppers never cracked, unlike almost ALL the Docs I’d had for any longer period previously.

And now to make them my own. In the past I had a striking pair of cherry-red square-toed DM shoes, which I loved, and a quite bizarre limited-edition pair of boots in beige(!) hessian(!!), which I dyed purple and loved almost as much, even though they spent most of their lifetime looking rather scruffy and being decidedly non-waterproof. I’ve seen people with beads or trinkets threaded onto the laces of their boots, and I decided to try something similar. On my way to the rather funky bead shop, I happened to go into a cheap accessory store that was having a sale on. I bought two cheap Christmas bracelets and decided to plunder them for sparkly stuff to thread onto the laces of my new boots, magpie that I am. You can see my “plunder stash” and the final result below (you can click on the picture of the boots to see a larger version). It may end up feeling a bit OTT – I’ll have to see, but for now I’m happy.

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Filed under Creative stuff

Week 3 – final edits and the aesthetics of space

You may remember that I posted last July about a writing project I’d decided to take on. Well, just six months on, week 3 of this year saw me doing the final edits on the print-ready PDF of the whole thing before it went to press a few days ago – yay! It’s hard to believe how fast it’s all gone, the sheer volume of work and effort that were involved, the amount I’ve learned and the new skills and responsibilities it’s brought. I can’t wait until it finally comes out – I think the publication date is in March (watch this space…).

Any writing project brings with it serious considerations about use of space. In the academic writing I did in the distant past, word counts and style sheets were the all-important units of measurement. Writing for the commercial educational sector brings further constraints, most significantly the need to plan content for each page of each chapter in detail before you’ve even started, and the need for your units to fit onto the page format of the final product. For the first publication of this kind I did, I didn’t really know in advance what kind of space per page was going to be available and this led to much agonizing cutting of material in the latter editing stages (and given that this then had a knock-on effect for the solutions section and the glossary, it was all the more of a headache as a result). For another project, where limited space was a major and deliberate feature, the template I was given to insert content into was so detailed that it more or less automatically generated a WYSIWYG final format and I could see immediately where I needed to economize. This latest project has been somewhere in between these two extremes. While the document template took into account page size/layout and roughly managed things like font size and spacing for the different types and functions of text on any given page, there was still a lot of guesswork regarding how much space various other essential non-textual elements might take up.

Most significantly, this publication was to have lots of full-colour pictures, ranging from thumbnails to double-page spreads, and these in fact accounted for many of these unknown quantities regarding space. The necessity for me to think of the illustration aspect at all times really added a further major layer of planning to the whole project and one that proved at least as complex as the generation of text “content” – and this, I think, was the biggest eye-opener of the whole experience. In many instances I could just indicate where I wanted a photo of what, and someone else would later have the task of sourcing suitable images, but I was also given a list of stock photo sites I could use to source particular images if I wished to do so. I think this combination of perceived freedoms gave me a bit too much ill-founded confidence at first: it was tempting to think the world was my oyster and that I would find a photo of anything I damn well wanted via the powerful search engines each stock photo provider offered, or that writing “please insert photo of x here” would be the end of the matter. Wrong. Big fat wrong.

It was only when I was part of the way through the project that I started actively trying to select my own choice of images for inclusion, having decided that since I do have ideas about what sorts of photos I like and what I don’t, I might as well exercise this choice. And it was at this point that my naivety became blatantly obvious – no, you cannot simply find a picture of this or that brand, this or that paid tourist attraction, or this or that celebrity on stock photo sites, or at least not for any kind of commercial use. This set me into a spiral of despair at first as it necessitated rethinking a number of activities I had planned to base around just these kinds of pictures. Ultimately, though, it led to me having simply to think rather more creatively about how to adapt to the constraints I’d discovered, and although the frustration at not finding a picture of this or that did continue to the end, I think it’s true to say that rather more good ideas were born of this restriction than were nipped in the bud by it. [Insert pithy quote about adversity and creativity here :)]

Needless to say, it was quite something to receive the “semi-final” PDF version of the final document, all typeset, in full colour and with all the photos, for detailed proofreading and final tweaks. What needed to be changed at this stage wasn’t generated so much by mistakes – almost all of these had been nit-pickingly spotted and eradicated earlier – or by the desire to reformulate something more impressively / simply / effectively, but rather by aesthetics and more immediate, measurable considerations of space and spacing. This sentence needed to be shortened so that it didn’t run on to a second line or have such an awkward line break, or that item should be deleted or moved so that there was enough space for the picture / map / diagram; here something needed to be moved up or across a bit, while there some colour-coded items needed to be swapped around so that the overall impression was better balanced visually. It was quite a different kind of scrutiny and editing dictated by often very different considerations from what would govern a purely text-based entity, but I have to say that I enjoyed this challenge a great deal.

So now my work is done, and I can breathe a big sigh of relief. Thanks to all those who suffered and stoically put up with my periodic moaning, groaning and gnashing of teeth during this whole project. You know who you are.

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Filed under Books & reading, Work stuff

A new project takes shape

As my Facebook friends already know, I was contacted a couple of months ago by an educational publisher I have worked with several times before. The material I have produced for them previously has all been to do with self-study language learning at different levels and in different modes/formats, but this time they asked me if I’d be interested in producing a more “fact-based” book. Both the topic and the type of content* they were looking for immediately appealed to me, but I didn’t immediately say yes: this kind of project obviously brings a lot of extra work with it and when you have a steady full-time job that more than fills your days a lot of the time, you don’t necessarily hold your hand out for more. On the other hand, I do know from past experience that this kind of writing keeps you on your toes in a different way, sharpens your mind and brings out a lot of new and differently packaged material that in turn stimulates the production of creative teaching materials – in other words, it’s a valuable form of re-investment.

While I was still in the fairly static phase of mulling these things over, I semi-casually mentioned the matter on Facebook and was immediately bowled over by how enthusiastic everyone else was about this kind of project. Those working in academic research reminded me of the hoops you have to jump through just to get an article published, let alone a book, while others who are in various branches of the teaching profession were also fired up by the idea of reaching a wider audience beyond the familiar class/student profile. Ultimately I was convinced that this was an opportunity that I needed to grab, and I’m very grateful to everyone who helped me take that decision.

Now, several weeks later, I’m several steps further on – they asked for some sample content based on the basic outline I’d been given, which I provided, and they were pleased with that, saying that I could certainly actually use most of it in the finished product and that the contract was mine if I wanted it. I said yes.

My first submission deadline is tomorrow – a detailed chapter-by-chapter, page-by-page(!) breakdown of the content I plan to include. I’ve been working on it solidly the last couple of days and it’s now FINISHED. It’s all subject to change, of course, depending on the feedback I get from the project manager and the person who’s been assigned as my editor, but I’m keeping my fingers crossed that they’ll like the basic outline…

* I’m being intentionally vague here as I’m under contractual obligation not to divulge details (sorry!)

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Filed under Books & reading, Work stuff

Need something cattle-itic…

How many months has it been? Four since my last entry. Lots has been happening, a lot of stuff that’s kept me away from the computer – those of you who know me on Twitter especially might have noticed I’ve been a lot scarcer since the beginning of the year. Nothing bad has happened – in fact I’ve been having a grand time offline and intend to carry on doing so – but I’ve been neglecting my creativity a bit and it’s beginning to niggle me slightly.

Having talked to some friends who find themselves in a similar situation and who have come up with a range of ideas for new challenges, ranging from a picture a day, through imposing artistic restrictions on their work, to expressing themselves through a medium they don’t so often use, I’ve decided to blog something every day for the month of April. Each day I’ll post a picture that bears some relationship to something I’ve been doing, and a brief ramble, report or reflection on a topic that is at least vaguely related to the same.

Today’s picture is of a cross-stitch pattern I did at the weekend – no masterpiece, but I don’t often do needlework, let alone complete a needlework project. As a result I was really quite pleased to have got this little 5x5cm square completed without making any mistakes – yay! OK, it was a kit, so null points for originality, but it was a start at least…

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Filed under Up close and personal